Seasons of the Witch – Legends and Lore, Ancient Holidays And Some Not So Ancient!

Originally posted on Witches Of The Craft:

Seasons of the Witch – Legends and Lore, Ancient Holidays And Some Not So Ancient!

Remember The Ancient Ways and Keep Them Holy!
•           •           •           •.
Goddess Month of Moura begins 2/20 – 3/19
Celtic Tree Month of Ash, 3rd Moon of the Celtic Year – (Feb 18 – March 17)

•           •           •           •

February ~ Moon Phases
First Quarter falls on Wednesday, 25 February, 2015 at 12:15 PM

•           •           •           •

March Moon Phases
Full “Worm” Moon falls on Thursday, 05 March, 2015 at 1:06 PM
Last Quarter falls on Friday, 13 March, 2015 at 1:49 PM
New Moon falls on…

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Salvia lyrata – also known as lyreleaf sage, wild sage, cancerweed

Featured Image -- 465

Originally posted on Mystical Magical Herbs:

lyrata

If you live on the U.S. mainland, especially the eastern half, you’ve probably seen this prolific plant growing along roadsides or in vacant lots.  It is also planted in gardens.

It prefers full sun, and loamy soil that is rich in organic matter. The plants are beautiful when in bloom, producing pale, blue bell-shaped flowers that attract hummingbirds, bees and butterflies.

lyreleaf sage 2 Lyreleaf sage leaves

Growing lyreleaf sage
Start seeds inside 6 weeks before planting outside. Fill small pots with high quality seed starting mix or lightweight potting soil. Moisten the soil in the cups thoroughly, then press the seeds on top of the soil. Do not cover the seeds as they require light to germinate. Place the cups in a warm and sunny area. Keep the soil moist but not overly wet. The seeds will sprout in about two weeks. Plant outdoors once all danger of frost is past.
Traditional…

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WOTC Extra – Divining With Stones

Originally posted on Witches Of The Craft:


Egyptian Comments & Graphics

Divining With Stones

This is a simple device used to obtain yes or no answers to pertinent questions. As such, it is a form of divination. Stones have existed for a long time and will be around for quite a bit longer. As such, they are symbols of the wisdom of eternity. They are frequently turned to for answers to important questions.

Obtain three stones. One, of a bright color, should be a high-vibration stone. Another, of a dark color, should possess low vibrations. Select a third that seems to have medium vibrations that are neither high nor low. This should be unusually colored so that it can be easily differentiated from the others. All three stones, in fact, should be of such individual appearances that they are immediately recognizable.

When you need an answer to a yes/ no question, roll the stones in your hands like dice, mentally asking…

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Let’s Talk Witch – Stone Magick

Originally posted on Witches Of The Craft:


Egyptian Comments & Graphics

Stone Magick

The magic of stones is one that nearly everyone is familiar with, for most people at least know of the existence of birth stones, the stone said to “belong” to the month of your birth. There is also a wide body of lore regarding the powers and magical uses of precious and semiprecious stones. For years it has been commonly said that pearls cause tears, opals are bad luck for some to wear, and that diamonds represent the constancy of love and that is why they are used in wedding and engagement rings.

Though the lore of precious stones and semiprecious stones is often quite contradictory (some authorities claim pearls cause tears of joy, and that opals are good luck) it isn’t important, because it is an expensive practice few of us could afford.

But the common, everyday stones you see lying on the street or dig up…

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Friday the Thirteenth – Again. So Good Luck spells all around – again!

Originally posted on Kitchen Witchcraft:

Hello, Readers, and good luck to You!

luckyFunny thing – last time I wrote about Friday the 13th, it resulted in a record number of visits to Kitchen Witchcraft from all around the world.
I guess we all feel we need a little help and a little good luck on such supernaturally charged day. So, this year I’ve gathered quite a few spells for You all – something ceremonial and something informal, something symbolical and something practical, something for the altar and something for the stove. A bunch of luck and prosperity spells for the day that is known to be jinxed and bad for business.

As you will no doubt notice, most of these recipes call for similar ingredients: there are many variations, but cinnamon and nutmeg will be in there somewhere. I guess they are exceptionally lucky. The colour green is often present in these spells as well, symbolising…

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Tea Tree Oil – 80 uses

I found this on Facebook, it was posted by Courtney Luper and I thought it was a great post.

Tea Tree

Tea Tree Oil Uses

Who knew tea tree oil could do so much??? It even gets rid of skin tags! WOW!!!!

80 USES OF TEA TREE OIL

Tea tree oil is a concentrated plant oil from the leaves of a tree native to Australian coastal areas.

WARNINGS: Tea tree oil should not be swallowed.Avoid tea tree oil if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Keep tea tree oil out of the reach of children and pets.

Abrasions & Minor Cuts: After cleaning the area well, apply a few drops of the oil directly. If a bandage is needed, allow a few drops of the oil to penetrate a cotton ball, then lay it face down on the wound with a bandage on top.

Acne: Add a drop to your normal cleansing routine or dab a very small amount on acne breakouts. You can also add 20 – 40 drops of the oil to your regular face wash.

Air Freshener: Keep a supply of cotton balls soaked in tea tree oil packed away in a plastic bag or tin. When confronted with foul smells from cooking, musty orders from dampness or even the medicinal smell in a sick room, take a few out the freshen the air and remove the nasty smell.

Allergies: Use topically by massaging into the chest, abdomen or the reflex points of the feet.

Arthritis: To help reduce pain associated with the swelling of arthritis, add 20 drops of tea tree oil to 2 ounces of grapeseed or other carrier oil. Massage into affected area 2-3 times a day.

Asthma: Add a few drops of oil to a pan of water and heat on stove. When cooling, drape a towel over head and breath in for a few minutes.

Athletes Foot: Clean feet thoroughly, especially between toes. Add oil directly to feet every two weeks, dusting with corn starch after. Or add 10 drops oil to 1 tbsp of grapeseed or other carrier oil and massage on feet and between toes daily.

Baby Care: Keep your diaper pail clean and fresh with a spray of tea tree oil mixed with water.

Bacterial Infections: Use topically, either massaging into the reflex points of the feet, adding several drops to a bath or cautiously applying over an infected site.

Bad Breath: Rinse with 1 ounce water and 1 drop oil. Do not swallow!

Bladder Infection: In a shallow bath, add 10 – 15 drops of oil. Sit and wash area carefully.

Blisters: Wash area carefully, then apply as for cuts and wounds.
Boils: Apply a warm washcloth for a few minutes. Then apply a drop or two of oil to the area – the infection should rise to surface and eventually be released.
Bronchial Congestion: Use as directed for Asthma. Add 5 – 10 drops to 1 ounce of carrier oil, and massage into chest and throat 2 – 3 times daily.

Bronchitis: Add 1-2 drops to a pan of hot water and breath in the steam, or massage the oil over the chest.

Bruises: After icing, apply oil as directed for Arthritis.

Bunions: Massage area with 5 drops oil to 1 tbsp. of carrier oil.

Burns: Run icy cold water on area. After a few minutes, add a mix of 5 drops oil with 1 tsp. raw honey. Repeat 3 – 5 times daily.

Calluses & Corns: Massage area with 5 drops oil to 1 tbsp. of carrier oil. Repeat 2 times daily. Once the corn or calluses have become soft use tweezers to remove, and apply a few drops of tea tree oil and cover with bandage.

Canker Sores: Apply a drop or two of oil directly to infected area with a cotton swab, 2 times daily. Also, rinse as directed for bad breath.

Carbuncles: Add a drop or two of oil to cotton swab and apply directly to carbuncle. Repeat twice daily.

Chapped Lips: Add 1 or 2 drops of oil to lip balm. Apply to lips as necessary.

Chicken Pox: Apply a drop of oil directly to blisters. Allow to dry, then dust with corn starch. Repeat every few hours or until blisters disappear.

Chigger Bites: Apply a drop of oil directly to bites.

Cold Sores: Apply a drop or two of oil directly to the sore with a cotton swab. Re-apply 2 – 3 times daily.

Coughs: Use as directed for bronchial infections. For a vaporizer, add 10 drops to steamer and leave on 5 – 10 minutes.

Dandruff: Add 20 – 30 drops oil to any shampoo. Apply a few drops to scalp and massage after washing.

Dermatitis: Add 10 drops oil to 1 tbsp of grapeseed or other oil and massage into affected areas. Repeat 2-3 times daily.

Dry Skin: Add 5 drops oil to 1 tbsp sweet almond oil. Massage into skin.

Earache and Infection: Add 2 – 3 drops of oil to 2 tbsp warm olive oil. With a dropper, drop a small amount into aching ear, tilting head to one side for a moment. Use cotton swab to absorb oil. Repeat 2 – 3 times daily.

Eczema: Add 10 drops oil to 1 tbsp grapeseed oil or coconut oil and massage into affected areas. Repeat 2-3 times daily. Also can be applied undiluted.

Emphysema: Use as directed for bronchial infections. For a vaporizer, add 10 drops to steamer and leave on 5 – 10 minutes.

Flea Bites: Apply a drop of oil directly to bites.

Gout: Add 10 drops of oil to 2 tbsp of carrier oil; massage into affected area 2-3 times a day.

Gum Disease: Create a mouthwash with purified water, 1 drop of peppermint and 1 drop of tea tree oil.

Head Lice: Add 20 drops of oil to 2 tbsp shampoo. Massage into scalp and hair, leave on for 10 minutes. Rinse. Repeat 3 – 4 times daily, until eggs are gone.

Hives: Add 10 drops of oil to 4 tbsp of witch hazel. Apply with cotton ball. Or, mix with coconut oil (which is naturally healing and soothing itself) and gently apply to the infected areas.

Homemade Mouthwash: Make a simple homemade mouthwash with purified water and tea tree oil.

Household Cleaning: Can be used aromatically or added to homemade cleaners to kill germs and prevent the spread of colds and flus. You can make a general tea tree cleaner by combining 2 teaspoons of tea tree oil with 2 cups of water in a spray bottle. Shake to blend and use for household cleaning tasks. This is especially good in the bathroom and in toilets.

Immune System: To stimulate the immune system, diffuse through the air on a regular basis, massage into the soles of the feet to increase your immune response.

Infected Wounds: Adding the oil to steaming water, hold the infected area over the steam. Or dilute 1 drop of tea tree with 1 cup of water and rinse the infected area 1-2 times a day, as needed.

Inflammation: Massage over the inflamed areas, gently and always toward the heart, or diffuse and inhale the tea tree oil directly or indirectly.

Ingrown Hairs: Add 1 – 2 drops of oil directly to area. Repeat every 2 hours or until signs of infection disappear.

Insect Repellant: Add 15 drops to a quart of water and use as an effective insect repellent.

Jock Itch: Apply 10 – 15 drops of oil to 2 tbsp of carrier oil. Apply 2 times daily. Dust with corn starch, to reduce chapping.

Laryngitis: Add 5 – 10 drops of oil and pinch of sea salt to 1 cup of warm water, gargle 2-3 times a day. Do not swallow!

Laundry Helper: Add 1/2 teaspoon tea tree oil to your laundry for towels and other fabric prone to getting moldy.

Mildew and Mold Remover: Spray an all-purpose cleaner made with 2 teaspoons of tea tree oil and 2 cups of water on growing mold and mildew. Shake well before using and do not rinse.

Mosquito Bites: Apply a drop of oil directly to bites.

Muscle Aches and Pains: Add 10-15 drops of oil to half cup Epsom salts, and dissolve in bath. Add 10 drops of oil to 2 tbsp of carrier oil. Massage well.

Mumps: Massage over the body and into the feet, and diffuse through the home.

Nail Fungus: Add 1 – 2 drops of oil directly to nail and the surrounding tissue. Allow to dry completely on hands before touching anything. Repeat morning and night for a week.

Pest Control: Household ants and other pests dislike Tea Tree Oil, so a few drops put at the point of entry will deter them. Wipe cupboards out with an oil and water solution to keep ants away.

Plantar Warts: Apply oil undiluted to affected area 2-3 times daily.

Psoriasis: Add 10 drops oil to 1 tbsp carrier oil and massage into affected areas. Repeat 2-3 times daily. Also can be applied undiluted.

Rashes: Mix with coconut oil and massage over the affected areas.

Rheumatism: To help reduce pain associated with rheumatism, add 20 drops of tea tree oil to 2 ounces of carrier oil. Massage into affected are 2-3 times a day.

Ringworm: Apply a drop or two of oil undiluted, repeat 2 times daily. Can also mix 1 drop of tea tree oil with 1 drop of lavender oil for added benefit.

Rubella: Dilute as needed and massage into the affected areas.

Scabies: Apply 1 – 2 drops of oil directly to area in the morning and at night.

Sciatica: Add 10 drops oil to 1 tbsp carrier oil and massage into affected areas. Repeat 2-3 times daily. Also can be applied undiluted.

Seborrhea: For skin: Add 10 drops oil to 1 tbsp of carrier oil and massage into affected areas. Repeat 2-3 times daily. For scalp: Add 10 drops of oil to 2 tbsp shampoo. Massage into scalp and hair, leave on for 10 minutes. Rinse. Repeat 3 – 4 times daily. Bath: Add 10-15 drops of oil to bath.

Shingles: Add 10-15 drops of oil to half cup Epsom salts, and dissolve in bath. Add 10 drops of oil to 2 tbsp of grapeseed oil or coconut oil and massage well.

Shock: Massage tea tree oil into the soles of the feet as needed.

Sinusitis: Use as directed for bronchial infections. For a vaporizer, add 10 drops to steamer and leave on 5 – 10 minutes. Also add 2 drops to a neti pot.

Sore muscles: Fill your bathtub with warm water. Add a few drops of tea tree oil to the water to relax tight muscles.

Sore Throat: Add 2 drops of oil to 1 cup of warm water with pinch of sea salt, gargle 2-3 times a day. Do not swallow!

Staph Infection: Best used topically, rubbed into the soles of the feet to increase the immune response and fight infection.

Stye: Add 5 drops oil to a pan of steaming water. Drape towel overhead and steam 5 minutes. Apply warm compresses directly to stye.

Sunburn: Mix 1 TB coconut oil with 1 drop of tea tree and 1 drop of lavender and gently apply to to sunburned areas.

Tattoos: Apply after tattoos to avoid infection. Use undiluted, diluted with coconut oil or as a spray with purified water.

Thrush: Gargle with sea salt, warm water and 1 drop of tea tree.

Ticks: Apply a drop or two directly to the tick and the surrounding area.

Toenail fungus: Rub the tea tree oil directly onto the affected toenail and underneath the tip of the nail. Apply 1 to 2 drops of tea tree oil. Apply the oil once a day, preferably at bedtime.

Toothbrush Cleaner: Apply oil directly to toothbrush 1-2 times a week to kill bacteria.

Tonsillitis: Inhale from steaming water with tea tree, gargle, and massage into neck and soles of feet.

Vaginal Infection: Add several drops to the bath water.

Viral Infections: Diffuse tea tree oil throughout the home or inhale from steaming water.

Warts and Skin Tags: Apply undiluted directly to wart. Use morning and night, until wart/skin tag fall off. Dilute if necessary for sensitive skin.

Wounds: Soak wounded area in water with tea tree oil, or spritz from a bottle of water with several drops of oil. Depending on the wound and your own sensitivity you may be able to apply directly.

WARNINGS: Tea tree oil should not be swallowed. Avoid tea tree oil if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Keep tea tree oil out of the reach of children and pets.

 

Faerie Beings – Ankou

Ankou

ankou1

Land of Origin: Brittany

Other Origins: Ankou is also part of the faery lore of Cornwall and Wales, and is deeply a part of Irish mythology.

Other Names: Death, the Grim Reaper, Father Time. A personified version of death is part of the folklore of many cultures, yet there is no evidence to suggest that any of these beings were ever worshipped as Death Gods.

Element: Ankou, like the deities, is part of all elements, including the elusive fifth element, spirit.

Appearance and Temperament: Ankou (ahn-koo) is the personification of death who comes to collect the souls of passed-over humans. He is male, dark, and rather Dickensian with his black robed costume pulled up high about his head. No one living has ever seen his face, for to do so would be to die. Ankou shows no interest in humans or other lives; he merely does his job.

Time Most Active: All year.

Lore: Ankou came to Ireland from the Celtic lore of Brittany in northern France, where he has largely been forgotten. The Irish term for physical death, an bas (awn bays), is rarely used to refer to the entity of Death, but rather the state of death.

Ankou drives a black cart, though some say it is really a small coach or even a hearse, drawn by four black horses in which he comes to collect the souls of those recently passed over and escort them into the Land of the Dead. In Ireland’s County Roscommon there is a documented story of a mother and daughter who would hear the coach pass by their cottage each night and around midnight accompanied by beautiful faery music, and though they could hear the music and the rattle of carriage wheels, they could never see a thing.

An old Irish proverb says, “When Ankou comes, he will not go away empty.” In Ireland, Ankou is always classified as a faery rather than a ghost or some other type of spirit, and he is given more of a personality than he is accorded in many other lands. In this he is more like the Death of modern movies such as Death Takes a Holiday and On Borrowed Time.

Where to Find Him: Unknown.

How to Contact: Contact not advised!

Magikal and Ritual Help: If you see him out on his travels, you need not fear. Stand away at a respectful distance and watch to help gain an understanding of the meaning of physical death.

 Ankou2

Source: A Witches Guide to Faery Folk by Edain McCoy